Ginger HDR Beta Available (previously NaturalHDR)

Got some big news for you all today.

  1. Natural HDR is now called Ginger HDR. It’s a long story but it has to do with business and legal stuff. But the message is still the same: Ginger HDR is an After Effects plugin for HDR Tonemapping in a natural way.
  2. The Beta is finally open to anyone. Get it while it’s hot: GingerHDR.com.
  3. There are also several tutorials available that should get you started.

So try it out and let me know how it works for you. To see all the goodies go to:

GingerHDR.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/shalom.sutherland Shalom Sardo

    i love this..will u guys be making a mac version so i can give it a try ?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=581245509 Robert Smith

    Site is down? =( The correct URL is http://www.naturalhdr.com!

  • Alvin

    Awesome…LIke the previous post…When will there be a MAC version? :)
    btw…love your Filmic Games blog

  • http://blog.19lights.com John Hable

    Should be working now?

  • http://blog.19lights.com John Hable

    Yep!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=581245509 Robert Smith

    Yep works fine!

  • http://www.facebook.com/shalom.sutherland Shalom Sardo

    thanks..looking forward to it

  • Johnhable

    It really depends. In the case of HDR timelapse, you have a bunch of 100 ISO images stacked together so you don’t see any noise or dithering. The same is mostly true if you use RED HDRx, since you have two good clean exposures to get data from.

    The approach that you are talking about though is if you just shoot an image underexposed and then tonemap it. In that case it really depends on the camera and the output. I’ve heard that with the Alexa you have about 4 “extra” stops of DR, so you could underexpose by 4 stops, process that, and it would still be clean. You seem to have extra range with the Epic and Scarlet as well. Not sure about some of the other cameras though.

    The output matters too. If you’re shooting on Alexa in a dark room for a 4k movie then the noise might not be ok. But if you’re shooting for a 1080p broadcast which will destroy your blacks anyways then you’re probably fine. Is there a specific camera you’re thinking about?

  • http://www.facebook.com/shalom.sutherland Shalom Sardo

    The Canon 7d…im assuming it would be best to over expose the shot by at least 1.5 stops and use natural hdr to recover the highlight an then balance the dynamic rance from their(as seen in one of your video tutorials) ?

  • JohnHable

    Hi. Actually, I generally argue that you should try to keep your “base” track close to the final output exposure. And then use the underexposed track for recovering highlights. Only overexpose your base track if there is dark shadow detail that you actually want to use.

  • http://blog.19lights.com John Hable

    Hi Shalom. Actually, I generally argue that you should keep your “base” track as close as possible to your output exposure and then only use the underexposed track for recovering highlights. You should only overexpose your base track if there is shadow detail that you actually want to recover. Merging to HDR is an inexact process and you will have fewer merging issues if you take as little as possible from your underexposed track.